Meet Biggles

This is Biggles. He was a much loved dog at The Rocks in Sydney where he lived. He was often seen on the back of a bike in a milk crate riding around with his owner.


This reminded me instantly of Greyfriars Bobby, a Skye Terrier that spent the last 14 years of his life in the 19th century guarding the grave of his owner, John Gray. My mother introduced me to Bobby in Edinburgh (where she was also born) and I have walked by the statue many times.

The monument has had a problem with tourists rubbing Bobby’s nose for good luck. This has caused discolouration and signs have been put around his neck asking passers by to refrain from doing so.

Back to Biggles, I had to Google him for a little more info. I’m sure the local tourist information centre could have provided it however I decided to explore the streets a little further and do a quick search later. Monument Australia provided the following.

‘Biggles was regarded as a `local character` among the residents and shopkeepers as he roamed the Rocks Area sometimes leaping from balconies in pursuit of cats. Unfortunately for Biggles, his final leap was off a cliff near Mrs Macquarie`s Chair after what was thought to have been a rat. Biggles died at the age of fourteen and is now immortalised in the statue created by artist, Anne Dybka, herself a resident of the Rocks.’

He spent his whole life chasing, as we should be doing with our dreams. Bobby spent his whole life loving, equally admirable. 

Has your hometown had a very popular pet, one that fits beautifully into the community? Does it have one currently that deserves a statue in the future?

Let’s all be like Biggles and Bobby. I for one could certainly learn a thing or two from these great dogs.

Advertisements

Scratch your name 

There is something beautiful about carving your name into history when it isn’t in a toilet cubicle.

This was below a bar if you’re wondering, I took a snap whilst waiting to be served.

When it is welcomed it’s fun. It is fascinating to read who it is and when it was, where they are from and the reason for being there. I love being able to glimpse into the lives of other people, even if it is for a second.  Whole lives glanced at for a few short moments, marriages and anniversaries, birthdays and first dates… Interesting stories that would be missed if I was to simply look elsewhere.

This is our everyday. We walk by amazing stories daily without knowing, as do others when they walk right by us. I built a tolerance for other people in the street when they seem mad, rushed or genuinely ignorant when I considered the fact that they may have similar problems to me. It is easy to judge a person instantly without the experience behind the scenes.

Thankfully, everyone seems content in this image, even Lucky despite losing her phone and wallet.

If you can’t be lucky, be happy.

 

Inundated

I always feel like I put weight on at festivals such as the Fringe. Not because of the beer and burgers but for the sheer amount of flyers I am given. 


Although it may be too late, if anyone is heading up to Edinburgh right now I highly recommend these guys. They are called LOVEHARD and the performance is called ‘Murdered by Murder’.


I saw them perform in a pub called The Newsroom, although this may have changed since. There was a stage with two actors and a coffee table, the room darkened with a third person playing piano along to the scenes. Set in the 1930’s, a group of friends play a murder mystery game on Christmas Eve at a stately home when an actual murder takes place. The performance takes you through the night and all of the accusations, twists and turns with plenty of wit and improv along the way.

What was unique about this performance was that the multiple characters were played by the two young actors you can see above. The stage must have only been ten feet wide in the basement of this pub, enough room to switch character with a ‘whoosh’ sound. The character changes must have been every ten seconds or so, and it worked both perfectly and hilariously.

It was completely unique and I don’t often throw recommendations out there, however this deserves one. Not in Edinburgh? If the great ratings keep coming I am sure they will be seen elsewhere. What I love about the Fringe Festival is that most of these shows are free and promoted via word of mouth. I paid a fiver towards it, into a bucket whilst leaving as they asked for donations. 

Sometimes the best things in life are free, and sometimes these things deserve a little money.

@LoveHardComedy
Facebook: LoveHardComedy

Where we choose to look in life 

We are a very proud species. What is better than admitting defeat is to keep looking the wrong way, hoping something on the horizon looks vaguely like the thing we are wanting to see.

I felt this picture deserved a post of its own. I knew right away what that post would be as I looked beyond the spyglass and onto the horizon and its constantly changing weather patterns. 

Taking a step back and viewing the horizon as a whole can be much better for gaining an accurate perspective. It may seem better to keep looking deeper and deeper into something to find meaning, sometimes the true discoveries are found by looking elsewhere. 

This is how I try to see life. If I am looking somewhere and get no results I will look elsewhere, even if that takes me out of my comfort zone. Looking elsewhere isn’t admitting defeat, and defeat may well lead to quicker success.