Skip to content

What do you hate?

Hate is underrated, I guess. If we don’t know or talk about what we hate, we have no way of making life better for ourselves and others. I was just watching a fascinating conversation on YouTube between two of my favourite speakers, Jordan Peterson and Sam Harris. Douglas Murray, someone that I am eager to research more on, was the moderator and to close the two hour long discussion, he ended with a question. If you are eager to watch the conversation on religion, it can be viewed here.

It was a rather humerous end as he had to bring the event to a halt due to time constraints, the topic being discussed at the time was the nature of love.

‘We had a long session on love just then, and I refuse to finish this evening on such a positive note.’

This was met with laughter by the crowd and speakers as, with the previous conversations they have had together, they are always productive and well mannered. Murray went on to say:

‘And I wanted to hand over to both of you to give an idea of not of your loves, but of your present hates’.

Peterson stated after a brief pause that what he hated was the evil inside us all, the part of him that could potentially not just be okay with being an Auschwitz prison guard, but would happily be. The evil that we possess whether we like it or not. Harris stated that he hates unnecessary suffering, his personal capacity for it and ‘everything in our culture that conspires to make the preciousness and the sacredness of the present moment difficult to realise.’

IMG_6561

I really like the question because it requires deep thought and in these examples, looking inward and at ourselves as well as the world around us.

And with that, what do I hate?

I agree with both speakers, and especially the answer of unnecessary suffering. This is the main reason why I decided to start blogging all those years ago, I have always desired to get my thoughts out there one way or another. The understanding that whilst I type these words, people are being imprisoned unjustly, tortured and enslaved for simply not conforming to the beliefs of those that have the ability to carry these evil acts out. Beliefs that are unworthy of such suffering.

Selfishness also comes into this and I find this a good and bad aspect of our nature. If I didn’t worry about how horrible it would feel for me to be in this situation and try to avoid it throughout my life, I would really struggle to show empathy and try to understand what it is like to be in their shoes. However this comes and goes from day to day, as I am sure is true of most if not all of us, as I struggle to be content with what I have a lot of the time. The more peaceful our lives are, the easier it is to become complacent, bored and desire more. This is a struggle as there is no end point here, only a desire to keep looking for happiness and the realisiation that we are not there and to become frustrated. I find one thing I strongly dislike about myself is that I don’t reflect enough on how lucky I am to be where I am and have what I have. A loving family, the ability to travel, the technology to be able to communicate with you all anywhere in the world. This selfishness does help inspire me to grow, but it doesn’t always help me appreciate what I already have.

I also hate not knowing the answers to life and the universe and the human desire to crave a bad answer over no answer at all. I am not religious and I feel that there are so many wrong answers about who we are and where we came from, and striving for the truth is like swimming against the current. We often crave answers that make us feel good, answers that we have been told throughout our lives and don’t require a change of thinking. I feel this will- and currently is- causing big problems in the world as this is a universal phenomena across many belief systems. If all of our differing cultures like to stick to what they currently believe, change and agreement will be slow. I wish we could fast forward this.

And with this I ask you, what do you hate? 

I would love to know and as always, I look forward to seeing you in the comments.

 

Advertisements

45 replies »

  1. Homelessness. Especially when I see it in a wealthy, developed, small country like the UK that could easily sort it out.
    The terrible suffering of all animals and birds that people eat or use for milk or eggs. There’s really no difference between animals we label as pets and those we label as food, in terms of their capacity to suffer, and in terms of our capacity to get fond of them if we gave them a chance!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Homelessness is a shame, especially in cities when I walk past homeless people on a daily basis in city centres and can’t do much to help. Are you a vegan? I have always said that if I was to stop eating meat, I would go straight to veganism. The animals that are kept alive to provide eggs and milk are truly suffering. But that is another thing I dislike about myself, the fact that I haven’t changed despite these thoughts.

      Thanks for commenting.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hi, I agree, we used to eat fish but almost no dairy, due to dairy indistry, but went all the way vegan April of last year. I actually used to think milk was crueller than fish, but then we decided to stop messing about and go all the way anyway! Right now I’m not a perfect vegan, I’m not checking labels (I can’t read them in Japanese) or being 100% strict re buns etc, but I don’t deleiberately order cheese, eggs or milk. I definitely wouldn’t eat meat or fish. I have very occasionally had some yoghurt during this trip as while we are travelling, it’s not always possible to access all the foods we’d eat at home to get proper nutrition. There are loads of amazing vegan meal bloggers, here is just one on WP, I look forward to having my own kitchen to make some of these things.https://earthofmaria.com/vegan-lentil-meatballs-curry-sauce/
        It’s not that hard and from a more esoteric point of view, your frequency rockets through the roof!
        I used to really love cheese but I also really like cows, and so every time I was tempted I’d just say think of the cows, (to myself, hopefully!) Some people say that the hardest thing about being vegan is other people, they can tease, try and pull you back, or feel the need to explain why they think eating meat is not wrong. (A crab in a basket will climb out, but if there are two crabs in a basket, the other will pull the other one back down. (I don’t know if that is really true but I like the metaphor so I keep using it! ))
        But hopefully you have nice, mature friends who would support you!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I don’t like people that mock vegans or vegetarians. You have made way more progress that I have with this in mind and I respect that. Also, those meatballs look delicious! The more interesting and tasty vegan recipes there are being created, the more motivated I am to heading that way.
        Thanks for the comment 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  2. This is a really interesting question as I’ve often been told not to use the word hate because it’s such a strong word. I often use dislike instead. I think I have people being inconsiderate. Why wouldn’t you take the opportunity to make life a little better for someone else and improve the world a little bit?!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Oh there is a few people that I hate. I remember my teacher telling me how he couldn’t think of anyone he truly hated and I was rather jealous of him. I was bullied growing up and it is hard not to hate these people. I did however switch between ‘hate’ and ‘dislike’ in my post when talking about myself as I didn’t want to use the word hate too much.
      But regarding your answer, I certainly dislike inconsiderate people. Whether it is someone jumping the queue, not being polite in general or worse. It isn’t very pleasant!

      Liked by 2 people

  3. My take on hate–and I agree with AJ that it is a very strong word–is that it is the yin to the yang of love–its negative image, To hate something, as to love something, requires passion and commitment. It is an active emotion–unlike indifference or apathy, which are passive. That being said, when I hated a 7th grade bully named Todd Childs, I did not “reverse love” him. No, the very thought of him made me shake with impotent rage.

    I no longer hate Todd Childs, coming up on 40 years since I last saw him.

    As for what I do hate–what I am willing to expend energy thinking about how much I “not love” it–I will go with the usual suspects: wanton cruelty, blind injustice, determined ignorance, slavish devotion to unreasoned beliefs. Cynicism, because it is so corrosive and counter-productive.

    And, most of all, hypocrisy.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I am glad you have moved on from the bully. I know what it is like and it is hard to forgive. I am with you in all of your responses, without these the world would be a much better place. And hypocrisy, incredibly frustrating when it occurs. I had to try hard to not use the word hate there 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  4. In consistence with your photos I have to admit that I hate fish and all kinds of food from the sea for eating. I can’t change this attitude cause alone the smell of it makes me feel uneasy what is a quite diplomatic description for my real feelings.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. We often crave answers that make us feel good, answers that we have been told throughout our lives and don’t require a change of thinking. — I agree with this 100%. I hate the way that religion is engrained in society’s norms. For example monogamy. From a biological perspective I don’t think humans were meant to be monogamous. That’s not to say I’m against the idea of marriage or anything, but I feel that if there wasn’t this expectation of monogamy and if human jealousy could be toned down, that people would end up a lot more fulfilled emotionally and sexually.

    I hate systems. While I realize most are designed with good intentions (make sure everyone receives an education, protect people, etc) too often they become corrupted and are very hard to change. The education system to me (at least in the US) has become too focused on test scores and teachers aren’t able to nourish creativity in students like they could in the past. I think it’s ridiculous the hoops that people have to jump through to move from country to country all because of imaginary borders that were created. I understand the safety purposes behind immigration policies, but we’re all humans of the same world. I remember my husband and I researching for curiosity how to move to Canada after we visited there and it just seemed like such a hassle it surprises me that people ever move at all.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Monogamy is a fascinating one, due to evolution it seems that our species has evolved to simply reproduce as much as possible, and interestingly religion amongst other things has made us change our ways. Sometimes this works, but often doesn’t.

      I do believe that although systems are necessary to maintain a level of order and prevent chaos, it can work against us and be incredibly problematic. Whether it is simply trying to change our cell phone provider or being sent to a concentration camp, systems can be incredibly problematic.

      Thanks for commenting and providing your opinions here 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Hate is something we have always had, and if anything ‘these days’ are probably filled with less hate than ever! Today, depending on where you are, is probably the best time to live in history. But yes, hate isn’t productive, but I thought it was an interesting question from the video.

      Thanks for commenting.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Fear has its benefits as a defence mechanism, however it can be a right pain in the backside and really prevent us from making the most out of life. If that fear means people then go on the attack, that is a danger that we are always vulnerable to. I have a love/hate relationship with fear because of these reasons.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. This question can be met with so many different answers. The answers can be deep and seemingly seriousness and other answers can seem silly to other people. I guess the question that comes to mind is which answers are you looking for?

    I hate the different things I struggle with day to day. I hate certain people that have caused me to struggle with these things. I hate that trustworthy people are hard to come by. I hate living life in fear and being conformed to one thing. But you see, I also hate simple things like roller coasters or vegetables. Such a broad question and it seems so simple, yet it’s so complicated.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Due to the nature of the talk and the answers provided by those in the video, I was looking for more serious hates and deeper answers that the simple ‘I hate my alarm clock going off in the morning!’.

      It seems though that we hate similar things, from the smaller issues such as roller coasters (I hate not being in control and being strapped into something) to dishonest people and those that make life difficult. But this is why I blog and I am sure you do too, to reflect on who I am and try to make the world a better place, one blog post at a time 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I have a love/hate relationship with humanity. We are capable of so many wonderful things, and yet we so often do just the opposite. It pains me. Literally.

    Aside from that, i hate when my dog poops 6 inches away from the blasted puppy pad.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Hate is really a strong word, I like to use the word dispise. That being said, I have silly things that I dispise but what I really DISPISE and LOATHE are bigoted ignorant people who REFUSE to do something about their ignorance.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Indifference, smugness, ad hoc assumption of authority by those who have none- These are my hates, as well as is unnecessary suffering. We all are overwhelmed by life, at times, but to have something in which one can be involved be brought to attention, and to summarily dismiss it- that is worthy of hatred.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Thank You!

  • 74,413 little bits of appreciation
Follow Living! on WordPress.com
%d bloggers like this: