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Non-existence

I often receive a certain criticism in response to my thoughts, feedback claiming that I shouldn’t be angry towards something that doesn’t exist. A very good point.

swedr

If it did come to light that a certain God existed, many atheists would remain reluctant to worship. I am one of them. Not every atheist agrees with this but many do. I split my time between disbelieving without sufficient evidence and providing opinions as to why I would disagree with a god if there was to be one.
This seems to cause confusion, apologies for this. I don’t believe in a God, the disagreements I have with a deity I don’t believe in are hypothetical. This doesn’t mean I do in fact believe he exists but that I have reasons to oppose him if he did, as so many choose to believe. 

I would do the same if everyone was convinced that Dr Evil existed. If there was very little evidence to suggest so yet people were convinced in the billions, I would take time out to see it from their side and if he does in fact exist, why we probably shouldn’t be worshipping him.

I also believe many people simply want me to believe in a God. Sadly I do not, even if you want me to. I just try to see it from your side from time to time.

16 replies »

    • I’ve always dreamed of creating content and reaching the dizzying heights of people racing for the first comment! I think I’m still a long way off 🙂
      What’s your opinion of this, do you have similar conversations?

      Liked by 1 person

      • I have had similar conversations alot of times, they have evn turned to arguments but well, thats how life is, there times i believe..times i dont..and being 19 doesnt even help either😂😂, but reading your blog gives me the assurance that i will one day find the answers and lead a fulfilling life😀. So thanks for blogging your thoughts!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Well you certainly have plenty of time to learn at just 19! I have changed my perceptions a few times since then (I am now 27). I don’t think anyone has the answers, but this doesn’t mean you can’t live a fulfilling life. I guess that is the main aim of my blog 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Like what? Having the power to protect the innocent, but not doing so? Refusing to intervene with the natural order of a species’ capabilities, when that intervention could prevent the needless death of our children?

      Yes, when someone makes a claim that there is a “Loving God,” and that god is demonstrably NOT loving, it would have plenty to answer for.

      To offer critique upon ourselves, might one suggest we look at sea turtles? It is illegal to interfere with their path to the ocean, even if it might save their lives. The piping plover, much the same. How about the Sentinelese People? They openly practice ritualistic sex/rape. They have no fire. They have no antibiotics or written language. Wouldn’t it be a kindness for you to bestow upon them, your lofty wisdom? Why don’t you? Did you know they existed until now? This is not an attack at you in the least, many brilliant people don’t know about the Sentinelese. But the point is, perhaps there is a god, with vast capabilities, but doesn’t intervene because…maybe they didn’t know? Or maybe the gods have laws they must obey? If there were/are any “gawds,” we would do well to learn about them before demanding answers from them. Perhaps they are aware of a universal construct in which, a baby dies of tragic heart conditions, and simultaneously lives in a multi-verse like parallel? So asking them to save one manifestation of an infinite number of this singular baby would be a null request?

      I’m curious, if you could ask god(s) a question, what would you ask? What would your demands be? And, as uncomfortable as it is for us to think about….Do we make the same demands of ourselves?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Interesting points, however I do refrain from comparing God and humans to the relationship between humans and sea turtles, for example. For one, God, from what we are taught, has an incomprehensible amount of power and wisdom. We do not, meaning I can excuse humans for not being able to end animal suffering, although we could be a lot better.
        I would be much more willing to believe in a creator that isn’t perfect, this would excuse the lack of intervention from an omnipotent and moral God. I don’t want to put words in the mouth of atheistmeow however we are constantly fed stories of a perfect God that is capable of such intervention, with varying reason as to why he doesn’t. This leads to plenty of questions.

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  1. If someone makes a claim regarding the nature and existence of a god, you would be wise to refute and argue against the claim. It suggests a noble character, that you (and those who left comments), demand a high moral standard in your gods. That they would have questions to answer.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. People want their gods to have the same characteristics as themselves in order to justify questionable behavior: jealousy, vengeance, patriarchy, self-righteousness, etc. Religion is an imagined order arising from the cowardly human tendency to refuse to admit a lack of knowledge and a neurotic need for meaning. Sadly, this causes many to miss the entire point of being alive which is, quite simply, to be alive.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I feel much more alive after leaving religion, I have much more of an urgency to do things and to enjoy life.

      ‘Religion is an imagined order arising from the cowardly human tendency to refuse to admit a lack of knowledge and a neurotic need for meaning.’ Would you say this is more the case in the 21st century, as we now have less reason to believe in a God? I can imagine many people of the past had a lack of knowledge, so a God made sense to them?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Certainly, the lack of knowledge thing was more prevalent in the past but now it seems that many of the fanatically religious are quite capable of denying proven facts, thus they refuse to acknowledge knowledge.

        Liked by 1 person

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