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Is nature beautiful?

Skimming though the blog posts today I found this interesting piece on natural beauty and God’s input on this.
The author of the post is a teacher, opening with the following-

Nearly all of my students disagree with me, but you cannot convince me that beauty is not one of the most compelling arguments for God’s existence.

What I want from a teacher is thinking outside of the box. To get student to push their thinking to knew, unexplored areas. In my opinion, the author/teacher is not thinking hard enough, or at least creating many more questions from her conclusion. 

Beauty would be a compelling argument for God if it were to be consistent throughout the world. Beauty is not always the case. Immediately I think of those born without the ability to see. The eye not able to function as well as the next person. This post from Christian Today speaks of the awful human suffering that goes on thanks to insects that can only survive by living off it’s unfortunate victims. Was God having an off day? Maybe he felt the world was looking a little too lovely and decided to throw a spanner in the works. He might also mourn with us, but I see no logic whatsoever in the creator and govenor of our universe being more powerless than our local doctor or nurse.

The following quote is taken from the book A Memory of Wonders, also used by the author.

Suddenly the sky over me and in some way around me, as I was on a small hillock, was all afire. The glory of the sunset was perhaps reflected in the myriads of particles of powdery sand still floating in the air. It was like an immense, feathery flame all scarlet, from one pole to the other, with touches of crimson and, on one side, of deep purple. I was caught in limitless beauty and radiant, singing splendor. And at the same time, with a cry of wonder in my heart, I knew that all of this beauty was created, I knew God. This was the word that my parents had hidden from me. I had nothing to name him: God, Dieu, Allah or Yahweh, as he is named by human lips, but my heart knew that all was from him and him alone and that he was such that I could address him and enter into relationship with him through prayer. I made my first act of adoration.

‘And at the same time, with a cry of wonder in my heart, I knew that all of this beauty was created, I knew God.’

This is such a huge jump. To claim to know God is as much of a false claim as it is an incorrect misinterpretation of the emotions felt at the time. Maybe this lady was filled with awe. What she wasn’t filled with was newly found knowledge of the universe.

‘I had nothing to name him: God, Dieu, Allah or Yahweh, as he is named by human lips, but my heart knew that all was from him and him alone and that he was such that I could address him and enter into relationship with him through prayer. I made my first act of adoration.’

Before I claim to know someone and begin to adore them, I at least expect to know their name. Maybe I am old fashioned like that. To go from zero to clingy after one experience is to me, pretty scary. A total abandonment of critical thinking and any form of rational analysis.

Let me make this clear, I do find nature breathtakingly beautiful. 

At times.

Mountains are incredible considering how they have formed over millions of years. The sheer size both humbling and mind-blowing. If I was to believe that these landscapes were made by a creator, my appreciation begins to slump. Afterall they’re lined with soil and dirt, the kind of substances you would shriek at if the dog was to drag it onto your newly cleaned carpet. Where is the imagination and innovation? How amazing would these ranges be if they were made of gleaming crystal for example? Or if we could take a dip in any ocean at any time and it be a consistent warm temperature for all to enjoy?

Right now over Northern England the skies are gloomy and overcast. Where are the myriads of particles of powdery sand floating behind a glorious sun?

Like anything, appreciation should come from consistency. Until then, question God instead of bowing at his feet.

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3 replies »

  1. Sounds like Paley and his blinded perspective. “A bee amongst the flowers in spring is one of the most cheerful objects that can be looked upon. Its life appears to be all enjoyment; so busy, and so pleased,” he wrote, but under the microscope the bee’s outer body is however found to be infested with the ferocious varroa mite, their airways riddled with impatiently greedy acarine (tracheal) mites, their intestines ravaged by the veracious nosema apis, and their hives, where some degree of safety should at least be expected, is instead crowded with gluttonous bacillus larvae and the hideous Brood Disease.

    Liked by 1 person

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