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Why do you think religion differs so much across the pond?

  
Is it that British history, full of both war and religion, has turned modern Britain away from our past ideologies?
Is it because Americans want to keep up the traditions early settlers left behind when finding a new life in unfamiliar surroundings?

Do you think it is down to something completely different? 

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4 replies »

  1. I think there’s lots of factors.

    I think a long history of wars over religion has soured Europeans on religion. The US hasn’t really had this. Our civil war wasn’t religion-based.

    I think part of it is that our separation of Church and State, while helping prevent religious wars, has also put religions in the position of competing for market share among potential believers. Any religious tradition that grows stodgy and complacent (like the CoE) will find itself losing out and fading away. Nobody’s “official”, so they all have to work extra hard.

    And I’m sure there’s other factors, but we’re slowly getting more secular. Our “unaffiliated” category is up to about 20% of the population!

    Liked by 1 person

    • 20% is certainly a huge chunk of the population!
      Every day going to college I would pass a town sign that also stated it was the battleground and the year, although I cannot recall exactly which one it was. It doesn’t take long to be reminded of such bloody wars, not to mention castles and the like that also serve as a reminder.
      The American set up does have pros to the cons.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Mostly it’s the result of our protections for religious belief in this country. We’ve become a haven for people fleeing from religious persecution, and on top of that we have a weaker national government than most European nations have (except maybe Switzerland). Sadly, it’s the extremists in our country which benefit the most from this situation.

    Still, Ubi’s right about the population not affiliating with religion, and atheists in this country doubled in expressing their atheism from 2007 to 2015 (now at 3%, or roughly 9 million). That’s a very significant thing.

    Liked by 1 person

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